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Frequently Asked Questions We provide this for informational purposes only. It does not constitute legal advice.

FAQs about the Constitutional Amendments Publication Commission (CAPC)

What is the law that sets up the Constitutional Amendments Publication Commission?

The law that sets up the Constitutional Amendments Publication Commission (CAPC) is Article 4A of Chapter 147 of the North Carolina General Statutes.

Does the CAPC decide whether an amendment will appear on the ballot?

No, that is not the role of the CAPC.

Can the CAPC change the wording of a constitutional amendment?

No, the CAPC cannot do that. Only the General Assembly can decide the wording of a constitutional amendment.

Can the CAPC change the ballot question relating to a constitutional amendment?

No, the CAPC cannot change the ballot question. Only the General Assembly can do that.

Can the CAPC tell me if I should vote for or against an amendment to the Constitution?

No, that is not the role of the CAPC.

Are CAPC meetings public?

Yes, CAPC meetings are public. Click here to view the public meeting notice.

If I attend a CAPC meeting, will I be able to present comments to the Commission?

No, CAPC meetings are not public hearings, so public comments are not accepted during the meetings. The meetings are not an occasion for the public to ask questions of Commissioners.

If I attend a CAPC meeting, will I be able to ask questions to the Commission?

No, CAPC meetings are public meetings for the purpose of conducting the business of the Commission. The meetings are not an occasion for the public to ask questions to Commissioners.

How can I submit proposed language for the CAPC to consider using?

You can find information about how to submit proposed language by clicking here.

FAQs about Constitutional Amendments

Where is the Constitution so I can read it?

The North Carolina General Assembly maintains a copy of the Constitution on its website. Click here to view the Constitution.

What does the law say about amending the Constitution?

The Constitution itself has provisions relating to how it can be amended. Click here to read that part of the Constitution. There are also provisions in the General Statutes and other places about amending the Constitution.

Is the ballot question about an amendment that I am asked to vote on the same as the text of the amendment?

The General Assembly decides the wording of the question that appears on the ballot. Sometimes, the wording of the amendment and the wording of the question are different.

How can I tell if the question on the ballot is different from the text of the amendment?

One way to figure that out is to read the final version of the bill that the General Assembly enacted in order to put the amendment on the ballot. The final version of the bill is called the Session Law. We have provided links to the Session Laws on the page on this website for each of the six amendments on the November election ballot. Click here to go to the main Commission webpage, where you can find the individual amendment pages.

How can I tell how an amendment will be implemented?

The General Assembly typically includes language that implements an amendment:

  • In the bill that places the amendment on the ballot so voters can decide if they want to amend the Constitution.
  • In a separate bill enacted or about at the same time as the bill that puts the amendment on the ballot.
  • Within the text of the constitutional amendment, itself.
  • It is possible to do it in a bill enacted after the voters decide to adopt the amendment.

Since there are six amendments on the ballot, do I have to vote on all six of the amendments?

There will be six individual constitutional amendment questions on the ballot. Voters have the freedom to vote on each of the amendments as they choose. Voters can choose to vote on all six amendments, on some but not others, or not on any of the amendments. It is not the role of the CAPC to tell voters how to vote.